About the Acadian Foularie

About This Video

In this video, Dr. Greg MacLeod describes the process of an Acadian foularie, a milling frolic. Fresh wool is spun and woven on a loom into a blanket. A fresh wool blanket is treated and shrunk during this process of milling, which is usually accompanied by song.

This performance was filmed during the book launch for AJB Johnston's Storied Shores: St. Peter's, Isle Madame, and Chapel Island in the 17th and 18th Centuries and Conference on History Based Tourism (Saint-Joseph-Du-Moine: les vielles chansons acadiennes, une foulerie et des danses carrées).

This 2004 recording was a co-production of The Tompkins Institute (Cape Breton University) and Telile Community Television. Participants at this event took part in une foulerie or a french milling frolic.

Watch the foularie process in the two videos, Cécilia and En Roulant Ma Boule.

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File Size: 46.7 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 01:12

Saint-Joseph-Du-Moine: les vielles chansons acadiennes, une foulerie et des danses carrées. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.



Rita Joe discusses the Ji'kmaqn

Transcription

Rita Joe: This thing here, it's...(Rita pulls a ji'kmaqn out of her basket)

Elizabeth Beaton: That looks very interesting.

Rita: Well, the Mi'kmaq Indian never used drums before - long time ago. They copied that from the other different tribes. But, this is...(Rita begins to hit the ji'kmaqn and sing)

Elizabeth:...Slap it against your thigh like that?

Rita: It's usually by your feet, or the hand, or over here (Rita slaps ji'kmaqn against knee and the table nearby)...Sort of a beat to it, you know...

EB: To keep time to a chant perhaps, or the beat of a dance?

Rita: Yes, the dance (Rita begins to sing Jukwa'lu'k Kwe'ji'ju'ow). That's one of them. You have to keep up the time with the...sometimes when you're singing different chants - on the side, or on the foot or on the hand.

Elizabeth: What sort of fir is that?

Rita: This is wiskok - black ash. They pound on it, you know. It's about this wide (Rita demonstrates width) when you first get it, cut it on the side. Then they pound on it with a heavy hammer. After a while, it splits...

Elizabeth: It splits naturally like that?

Rita: Naturally, like that, it splits.

Elizabeth: Isn't that interesting.

Rita: You just cover it up, make it fancy - gather it up on the ends so it'll stay put.

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File Size: 14.0 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 01:47

About This Video

In this video, Rita Joe discusses the ji'kmaqn - a traditional Mi'kmaw rattle made of split ash - with Dr. Elizabeth Beaton on the Beaton Institute program, Ethnic Corner.

Watch the ji'kmaqn in action in the following videos: Jukwa'lu'k Kwe'ji'ju'ow (Lee Cremo), Ko'jua (Lee Cremo), and Ko'jua (Noel Marshall).

Rita Joe, Ethnic Corner, 1981. FT-1(17). Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.



Sarah Denny and the Eskasoni Mi'kmaq Dancers perform Wapikatji'j

About This Video

In this video, Sarah Denny and the Eskasoni Mi'kmaq Dancers perform Wapikatji'j - The Little White Footed Dog.

This humourous song is about a dog with limp, which is mimicked by the dancers.

This performance was staged at a Micmac-Scottish Concert held on July 1, 1990 in Membertou.

Wapikatji'j, 1990. Sarah Denny and the Eskasoni Mi'kmaq Dancers. FT-95. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.

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File Size: 16.0 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 01:40



A Milling Frolic Video

About This Video

This videos features a staged presentation of a Scottish Cape Breton milling frolic.

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File Size: 23.1 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 02:00



Lee Cremo on A Real Stepdancer

Transcription

Lee Cremo: "A real stepdancer, I don't know if anybody explained it (Lee stands up and walks towards the center of the deck)...

A stepdancer - a real stepdancer - you're almost encroached, you're just in the sitting position, that's the stepdancing. (Lee stepdances). The less hand movement, you know.

The other part, you can call it more of a tap dancing, you know. (Lee tapdances). You want to use the heel.

With stepdancers, the less heel you use, the better stepdancer you are. It would be the same thing as...what do you call that thing - the ballet dancers. Ballet dancers don't hardly use their heel either, a lot of tip-toes."

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File Size: 8.53 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 00:58

About This Video

Comparing the differences in body position and foot movement of Scottish Cape Breton stepdancing to tapdancing, Lee Cremo shows us what it takes to be a real stepdancer.