Acadian Tradition: Wing Tra La

Click to enter photo gallery

Please enable Javascript and/or download Flash to hear audio and/or see video.

File Size: 3.42 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 02:29

Low bitrate for slow connections [0.99 MB / 56 kbps]

About This Song

In this selection, the narrative follows a suitor, a tailor, is rejected by the girl's father on the grounds that the suitor would be dangerous because of the needles with which he works.

The singers are Lucy Doucet and her son, Dan Doucet.

Wing Tra La, 1996. Lucy Doucet. T-3257. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.

About The Artist

Lucy Jane Doucet was born on March 1, 1909 in Belle Côte, Inverness County. She was the fourth of nine children born to Marcellin and Flavie Chiasson. Lucy attended school in Belle Côte until grade four. Her parents then suggested that she leave her studies to work at the lobster canning factory in Margaree Harbour. She worked as a manual labourer at the factory each spring for three years.

She later moved to Halifax, where she found work as a cook, parlour maid, butler, valet and kitchen maid in various family homes and at the Queens Hotel. On November 25, 1935, she married her husband Henry. Six years later, Lucy and Henry left Halifax for Belle Côte with their two children, Florence and Daniel, where they would spend the rest of their lives together.

Lucy had a lifelong passion for music. While attending the Belle Côte school, she learned many traditional French, English and Irish songs from a teacher. In her later years, Lucy remembered many of these songs and willingly shared them with individuals interested in preserving this part of Cape Breton's music history. She passed away at the age of 96 on March 15, 2005.

These rare audio recordings of Lucy Doucet found on this website will help future generations understand and appreciate the rich history of Acadian music.

Lyrics

1. Dans mon chemin faisant, rencontrè cavalier.
M'a parlé d'amourettes, je lui ai dit entrez.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

2. M'a parlé d'amourettes, je lui ai dit d'entrer:
«Monsieur, prenez une chaise, monsieur, venez causer.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

3. Monsieur, prenez une chaise, monsieur, venez causer.
Je ne veux pas une chaise; je veux me marier.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

4. Je ne veux pas un' chaise; je veux me marier
Avec la plus bell' fille qui soit dans le quartier.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

5. Avec la plus bell' fille qui soit dans le quartier,
Son pèr qu'est aux écoutes, s'est mis à tempêter.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

6. Son pèr qu'est aux écoutes, s'est mis à tempêter,
Je ne donn' pas ma fille à un vil couturier.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

7. Je ne donn' pas ma fille à un vil couturier,
Car avec ses aiguilles il pourrait la piquer.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

8. Car avec ses aiguilles il pourrait la piquer.
L'couturier s'en retourne, injuriant son métier.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

9. L'couturier s'en va, injuriant son métier.
Sinon de mes aiguilles, je serais marié.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.

10. Sinon de mes aiguilles, je serais marié
Avec la plus bell' fille qui soit dans le quartier.
Wing tra la de té, tra la la de té,
Tra la la de lai dé.