Acadian Tradition: C'est Une Bouteille De Rhum

Transcription

1. C'est une bouteille de rhum que j'me suis acheté,
C'est une bouteille de rhum que j'me suis acheté;
C'est dans un verre que j'l'ai renversé,
Glorium et spiritum et Dominum.
J'aime à boire du rhum
Et j'aime à boire du rhum
Et j'en ai pas encore bu.

2. C'est dans un verre que j'l'ai renversé; [bis]
C'est dans la gorge que ca va m'chauffer,
Glorium et spiritum et Dominum.
J'aime à boire du rhum
Et j'aime à boire du rhum
Et j'en ai pas encore bu.

3. C'est dans la gorge que ca va m'chauffer, [bis]
C'est dans les jambes que ca va m'trembler,
[et cetera]

4. C'est dans les jambes que ca va m'trembler, [bis]
C'est sur la rue que j'm'en va tomber.
[et cetera]

5. C'est sur la rue que j'm'en va tomber.
C'est un policeman qui va m'ramasser.

6. C'est un policeman qui va m'ramasser; [bis]
C'est dans la prison qu'ils vont m'amener.
[et cetera]

7. C'est dans la prison qu'ils vont m'amener. [bis]
C'est sur les planchés qu'ils vont m'faire coucher.
[et cetera]

8. C'est sur les planchés qu'ils vont m'faire coucher; [bis]
C'est du pain noir qu'ils vont m'faire manger.
[et cetera]

9. C'est du pain noir qu'ils vont m'faire manger; [bis]
C'est la honte au nez qui va m'rester.
[et cetera]

Please enable Javascript and/or download Flash to hear audio and/or see video.

File Size: 3.65 MB [192 kbps]

Running Time: 02:39

About This Song

A man likes rum. He drinks too much, gets picked up by a policeman, and ends up in jail with all its discomforts.

It is presented here in a video recording by the well-known Acadian singer, Leo à Pat Aucoin. The performance was a part of the book launch for AJB Johnston's Storied Shores: St. Peter's, Isle Madame, and Chapel Island in the 17th and 18th Centuries and Conference on History Based Tourism (Saint-Joseph-Du-Moine: les vielles chansons acadiennes, une foulerie et des danses carrées). This 2004 recording was a co-production of The Tompkins Institute (Cape Breton University) and Telile Community Television.

C'est Une Bouteille De Rhum, 2004. Saint-Joseph-Du-Moine: les vielles chansons acadiennes, une foulerie et des danses carrées. Léo à Pat Aucoin. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.

About The Artist

Léo Aucoin was born May 27, 1923 in Saint-Joseph-du-Moine, the fourth of twelve children born to Pat (à Jos à Dosithe à Michouque à Grannoume) Aucoin and Minnie (à Minou à Janvier à Frédérick à Augustin) Deveau.

When he was still quite young, Léo started singing old traditional songs without accompaniment. Over the years he became well known in the art of singing to the rhythms of his foot tapping. He collected and memorized many old Acadian songs. During his life, he learned hundreds of traditional songs and transcribed them in notebooks.

Léo Aucoin sang traditional Acadian songs at Expo '86 in Vancouver, British Columbia. He also performed at a special concert "Symphonie au Coeur de l'Acadie" in 1993, marking the centenary of Église Saint-Pierre in Chéticamp. Léo Aucoin also sang in the Helen Creighton Folk Festival in Dartmouth in 1992.

In 2001, Léo recorded more than 150 Acadian songs at Studio Marcel Doucet in Chéticamp. This special project was funded by Heritage Canada, l'Université Sainte-Anne and Nova Scotia Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage.

Léo Aucoin recorded his own compilation CD of 21 traditional Acadian songs in 2002.