Acadian Tradition: Allons Danser, Lanture

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About This Song

A girl turns down an invitation to supper because her father will disapprove. How will he know? The birds will tell him. The birds speak? Yes! French, English, Gaelic and Spanish.

The singer, Lucy Doucet heard this song once when she was a child. On a stormy day, an old neighbour sang it as they gathered around the kitchen stove. She remembered it into her old age.

The reference to Gaelic and Spanish is interesting, as it speaks to a time when sailors travelled from France to these countries.

Allons Danser, Lanture, 1996. Lucy Doucet. T-3257. Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University.

About The Artist

Lucy Jane Doucet was born on March 1, 1909 in Belle Côte, Inverness County. She was the fourth of nine children born to Marcellin and Flavie Chiasson. Lucy attended school in Belle Côte until grade four. Her parents then suggested that she leave her studies to work at the lobster canning factory in Margaree Harbour. She worked as a manual labourer at the factory each spring for three years.

She later moved to Halifax, where she found work as a cook, parlour maid, butler, valet and kitchen maid in various family homes and at the Queens Hotel. On November 25, 1935, she married her husband Henry. Six years later, Lucy and Henry left Halifax for Belle Côte with their two children, Florence and Daniel, where they would spend the rest of their lives together.

Lucy had a lifelong passion for music. While attending the Belle Côte school, she learned many traditional French, English and Irish songs from a teacher. In her later years, Lucy remembered many of these songs and willingly shared them with individuals interested in preserving this part of Cape Breton's music history. She passed away at the age of 96 on March 15, 2005.

These rare audio recordings of Lucy Doucet found on this website will help future generations understand and appreciate the rich history of Acadian music.

Lyrics

(Note: verses 1, 2, 3, and 13 are not sung in Lucy Doucet's version)

1. L'autre jour, en m'y promenant,
L'autre jour, en m'y promenant
Le long d'ces petits bois charmants.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

2. Le long d'ces petits bois charmants,
Le long d'ces petits bois charmants,
J'aperçois ma mi' derrièr' moi.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

3. J'aperçois ma mi' derrièr' moi,
J'aperçois ma mi' derrièr' moi
Et lui fais signe avec mon doigt.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons dancer,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons dancer,
Lan-ture.

4. Et lui fais signe avec mon doigt,
Et lui fais signe avec mon doigt
De venir souper avec moi.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

5. De venir souper avec moi,
De venir souper avec moi,
«Oh, non,» dit elle, «Je n'irai pas!»
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

6. «Oh, non,» dit il, «Je n'irai pas!»
«Oh, non,» dit il, «Je n'irai pas!»
«Car mon papa m'y battera.»
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

7. «Car mon papa m'y battera.»
«Car mon papa m'y battera.»
Mais dites moi donc qui lui dira?
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

8. Mais dites moi donc qui lui dira?
Mais dites moi donc qui lui dira?
Ce sera les oiseaux des champs.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

9. Ce sera les oiseaux des champs.
Ce sera les oiseaux des champs.
Les oiseaux des champs parlent-ils?
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

10. Les oiseaux des champs parlent-ils?
Les oiseaux des champs parlent-ils?
Ils parlent en anglais et en français.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

11. Ils parlent en anglais et en français.
Ils parlent en anglais et en français.
Des petits mots en écossais.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

12. Des petits mots en écossais.
Des petits mots en écossais,
Et puis en Espagnol aussi.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.

13. Ils parlent comme ils ont appris.
Ils parlent comme ils ont appris.
Car ils voltig'nt bien des pays.
Et lur-lan-ture.
Allons danser,
Lan-tu-re-lu-re-lur,
Allons danser,
Lan-ture.